Monday, December 10, 2012


One of Rietveld's main goals with the house was to delimit space while creating smooth transitional areas between the exterior and interior. His use of space-dividing elements as well as transitional elements (such as eaves, balconies, pillars, railings, door frames, and window frames) help communicate the architectural language of the house.


Overy et. al. p 121
The first area exists on the southwest facade facing Prins Hendriklaan. It begins at the gate which opens up from the sidewalk onto a path leading to a patio space. The small door on the patio leads into the studio on the ground floor. Directly above, the girls' room on the second floor opens up onto a balcony.


Overy et. al. p 121

The second transition area is also connected to the street by a path and gate. This path leads to a bench which sits beside the main entrance. Another bench exists inside in the front hall, directly in line with the exterior bench. A balcony extrudes into the exterior from the boy's room on the second floor, overhanging over the main entrance. 


Overy et. al. p 122
The eastern corner of the house connects to the exterior through windows on the first floor looking into the kitchen. On the second floor looking into the living/dining, the windows open at 90 degree angles (to line up with the mullions) and the eastern corner disappears completely. 
See: Disappearing corner window


Overy et. al. p 122
The fourth transition area consists of a patio on the first floor leading into the servant bedroom. It is covered by a balcony extruding from the living/dining room and Truus Schroder's bedroom above on the second floor. 

Overy et. al. p 122


The fifth area is a vertical shaft of light that begins at the bottom of the stairs on the ground floor. It continues up to the second floor and through the roof to a skylight which can be opened for roof access. 

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